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Relegion in utopia

Herbert George Wells (1866 - 1946) was an English novelist, journalist, sociologist and historian.

Religion in Wells' utopia is a personal need - as natural a part of life as hunger and thirst. Modern Utopian religion rejects the teaching that every human is born in sin. This illustration shows a Modern Utopian on his yearly pilgrimage of spiritual solitude. This pilgrimage allows him to reach the high distances of God. For seven consecutive days of each year every man or woman must 'go right out of all the life of man into some wild and solitary place, must speak to no man or woman, and have no sort of intercourse with mankind'.

The ruling class of the Modern Utopians is the Samurai. Their God is a mystical being rather than any defined, personified god. Public worship only takes place on occasions of state and public duty. The Samurai are motivated by the solitary life and silent, deliberate reflection. 'They will, therefore, set themselves private regimens to help their secret religious life' .

The culture of Wells' Modern Utopia is rational and scientific, but it is also rooted in mystical beliefs and spiritual disciplines.

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